First-Year Students’ Views on Prescribed Book for Translation Practice: A Case Study of a South African University of Technology

Authors

  • Aaron Mnguni Faculty of Humanities Central University of Technology, Free State P O Box 1881 Welkom 9460 RSA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.24203/ajhss.v8i2.6092

Keywords:

textbook, South Africa, language practice, students

Abstract

Translation as a field of study is fairly new in South Africa because before 1994, the official languages were English and Afrikaans and everybody was expected to know and use those languages. Consequently, there is not much about translation practice that is written by South African authors. Following this, translation books from outside South Africa are generally used and prescribed, thus stifling inherent experiences, since little is written by the South Africans themselves.  A total number of 46 language practice students participated in this quantitative study. This study explored challenges encountered by first year language practice students, when using their prescribed book, at the Central University of Technology, Welkom Campus. Results indicated that students were not benefitting maximally from using the prescribed book, which is by any standard an excellent book. The socio-cultural experiences of the students were missing, thus prevent students’ from mastering the subject content better. From the data collected, it is recommended, amongst other recommendations, that a bias towards books reflecting South African experiences be prioritized as well as also allowing students to participate in making book choices.

Author Biography

Aaron Mnguni, Faculty of Humanities Central University of Technology, Free State P O Box 1881 Welkom 9460 RSA

Faculty of Humanities Department of communications Lecturer

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Published

2020-05-03

How to Cite

Mnguni, A. (2020). First-Year Students’ Views on Prescribed Book for Translation Practice: A Case Study of a South African University of Technology. Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Studies, 8(2). https://doi.org/10.24203/ajhss.v8i2.6092

Issue

Section

Articles