Development of Commercial Belt Dryer for Granulated Cassava

Authors

  • Michael Agcaoili Gragasin Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization (PHilMech), Department of Agriculture (DA)
  • Romualdo C Martinez Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization (PHilMech), Department of Agriculture (DA)

Keywords:

Cassava, Manihot esculenta L, Belt Dryer, Postharvest, Agricultural Machinery

Abstract

This research has successfully designed, fabricated, and field tested a technically feasible mechanical dryer for granulated cassava.  Test results revealed that the developed drying technology has an input capacity of 1,158kgh-1, output capacity of 509kgh-1, and cassava product recovery of 44.2% with an average moisture reduction rate of 40.2%h-1.  Cost-benefit analysis showed that the technology is financially feasible given an internal rate of return of 17.12%.  Total drying cost per kilogram output is estimated at US$0.027 (US$=Php45).  By accounting all the costs involved in drying, the farmers can realize net benefits of US$136.40 per hectare for using the technology given a higher product recovery of 44-48% as compared to the traditional sun drying method of only 34-38%.  As such, this technology provides a viable alternative solution to the drying problem of farmers to sustain the growth of commercial production of cassava in the Philippines.

Author Biographies

Michael Agcaoili Gragasin, Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization (PHilMech), Department of Agriculture (DA)

Agricultural Mechanization Division

Supervising Science Research Specialist

Romualdo C Martinez, Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization (PHilMech), Department of Agriculture (DA)

Agricultural Mechanization Division
Chief, Science Research Specialist

References

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Published

2015-10-30

How to Cite

Gragasin, M. A., & Martinez, R. C. (2015). Development of Commercial Belt Dryer for Granulated Cassava. Asian Journal of Applied Sciences, 3(5). Retrieved from https://www.ajouronline.com/index.php/AJAS/article/view/3141